AT LAST: THE CONNECTED DISCOURSES OF THE BUDDHA Copy

Seated Buddha with teaching mudra. Sarnath Museum. Gupta period. 5th CE

THE SAYUTTA NIKĀYA

Ever since the recording of The Middle Length Discourses, in the translation by Bhikkhus Ñanamoli and Bodhi, was released in August 2019, Dharma Audiobooks has had numerous, regular requests for more of the complete Pāli translations of the Nikāyas.

Now, Taradasa’s recording of The Connected Discourses have been published on Audible – and quite a sizeable release it is, running to nearly 60 hours!!!

Bhikkhu Bodhi approached his task – started and finished by himself this time –initially in his normal meticulous, academic manner, balancing a very approachable translation of the text – and the Buddha was clearly concerned with communicating clearly without undue complexities and obfuscations!! – with an immense amount of introductory material.

In this, Bhikkhu Bodhi wanted to present the suttas in the best way possible for a 21st century audience, providing a context of physical, historical, philosophical and doctrinal matters to support the original Pāli text. His considerable erudition is a great service to the original texts.

However, his approach was book-based: it was designed to work as notes, footnotes, extended classification etc. This doesn’t really work in the linear format in which audiobooks live! So we at Dharma Audiobooks went to some considerable trouble to re-work the supplementary material, for example – placing the general introductions, the background and the specific introductions before each section rather than in introductory blocs.

Therefore, this recording does not follow the book version at all times. But the heart and purpose of Bhikkhu Bodhi’s concept has been maintained, we hope!

The Connected Discourses were clearly collected in the manner which has come down to us in order to preserve the Buddha’s teaching for an oral environment. There are many repetitions, many suttas with tiny variations as, so tradition and the Nikāyas suggest, the Buddha often repeated a teaching; and his followers felt it was important to record in their prodigious memories, every instance. Therefore the listening experience of the Samyutta Nikāya has to take this on board. To repeat, repetition is frequent!

Nevertheless, this recording offers a very strong connection with many key teachings, including ‘dependent origination’, ‘the five aggregates’, ‘the six sense bases’, ‘the seven factors of enlightenment’, ‘the Noble Eightfold Path’, ‘the Four Noble Truths’ and many more.

In addition to the recording, you will receive a sizeable downloadable pdf containing information which makes the navigation of the audio very user-friendly. It not only lists the five Parts, every vagga and the sutta, but also where to find the key teachings.

We hope this new recording will be of value to you in the further understanding and enjoyment of the Dhamma. Taradasa and I spent weeks in a small but private recording studio in the heart of Cambridge – at a time when Covid-19 was creating its own challenges for everyone. We would go in at 9am and, with a break for lunch and the occasional 10 minutes ‘time out’, record, discuss when necessary and make the occasional adjustments…and then emerge at 5pm. It was a challenging time, but we generally ended each day with a feeling of enrichment rather than fatigue. For us, it meant that we could appreciate, even more, the message of the Buddha, and his temperate but uncompromising expression of that message. And, of course, it brings us closer to the world when the Dhamma made its first extraordinary impact 2,500 years ago.

Nicolas Soames

THE NUMBERED DISCOURSES OF THE BUDDHA

THE NUMBERED DISCOURSES OF THE BUDDHA

Translated by Bhikkhu Sujato
Read by Taradasa
56 hours 50 minutes
 

The Numbered Discourses (Aṅguttara Nikāya) is the last and longest of the four primary divisions of the Sutta Piṭaka, (Baskets of Discourses) that make up the main original teachings of the Buddha . The word aṅguttara literally means “up by one factor”, i.e. “incremental”. It refers to the fact that the discourses are arranged by numbered sets, with the numbers increasing by one. It is divided into 11 Books (nipāta), each arranged in varying number of Chapters (vaggas ) which themselves contain numerous suttas (often grouped in thematic clusters). Continue Reading →

THE HUNGARIAN WHO WALKED TO HEAVEN

THE HUNGARIAN WHO WALKED TO HEAVEN

The remarkable story of Csoma de Kőrös
By Edward Fox
Read by Andrew Cullum
2 hours 21 minutes
 

This is a delightful short biography of an eccentric Hungarian scholar who became one of the fathers of Western studies of the Tibetan language and culture. Educated at an austere Calvinist school until aged 31 where he demonstrated exceptional skills as a linguist, Csoma de Kőrös (1784-1842) finally set out alone on a pilgrimage to the East. Continue Reading →

PEAKS AND LAMAS

PEAKS AND LAMAS

By Marco Pallis
Read by Ratnadhya
18 hours 18 minutes
 

 

Peaks and Lamas is one of the classic early 20th century accounts of travelling in the Himalayas on the borders of Tibet. It is, in its way, on a par with the more famous Mystery and Imagination in Tibet by Alexandra David-Néel (also available on Dharma Audiobooks). It describes two journeys in the 1930s, one physically active and one more of spiritual investigation. It starts as the title suggests, as a mountaineering adventure, when a group of English climbers set out to climb unconquered peaks in the Himalayas. Continue Reading →

THE LONG DISCOURSES OF THE BUDDHA

THE LONG DISCOURSES OF THE BUDDHA

By Dīgha Nikāya
Translated by Bhikkhu Sujato
Read by Taradasa
24 hours 21 minutes
 

The Long Discourses of the Buddha (Dīgha Nikāya) is the first of the five Nikāyas (Collections) in the Sutta Pitaka and has its own particular character. Unlike the others, which contain thousands of shorter discourses (suttas), it comprises just 34, but of much longer length – as the name indicates! This makes it, in some ways, a more focused collection of teachings of the Buddha and especially accessible on audiobook. Continue Reading →

Sister Vajira and Francis Story

Sister Vajira and Francis Story

Sister VajiraBorn Hannelore Wolf in 1928 in Germany, she became a Buddhist nun in 1955 in Sri Lanka. Suffering from ill-health, she became a translator of Pali texts. She disrobed in 1962, returned to Germany and died in 1991, aged 63. Francis Story (1910-1972) (Anagarika Sugatananda) was born in England in 1910 and became acquainted with Buddhist teachings early in life. For 25 years he lived in Asian countries — India, Burma, and Sri Lanka — where he deeply studied the Buddhist philosophy of life. With that background and endowed with a keen analytical mind, he produced a considerable body of writings, collected and published in three volumes by the Buddhist Publication Society.

F. L Woodward

F. L Woodward

FL_woodwardFrank Lee Woodward (1871-1952) was an unusual English figure who made a significant contribution to the wider understanding of Buddhism in the West. A classical scholar who became interested in Eastern religions, he learned Pali and after a period as headmaster in the UK, took up a similar post in Galle, Sri Lanka in 1903. By 1919 he was looking for peace and seclusion in which to continue his translations of the Buddhist scriptures for the Pali Text Society. Woodward settled near Launceston, Tasmania, and about 1927 bought a house in a neglected orchard in the Rowella district on the western bank of the Tamar River. A vegetarian, a mystic and a man of whimsy, he practised yoga, wore a turban and lived alone, surrounded by Buddhist scriptures on thousands of palm-leaves. Maintaining an extensive correspondence, he recorded the scores in every match played by the Bluecoat School’s Old Blues Rugby XV.
Among scholars, Woodward is revered for translating eighteen of the forty-two volumes of the Pali texts into English and for compiling the vast concordance of the Pali canon which occupied the last fifteen years of his life. At the popular level, his volume, Some Sayings of the Buddha (Oxford, 1925, 1939), has contributed to a wider understanding of Buddhism. Reduced to near poverty, Woodward died on 27 May 1952 at Beaconsfield Hospital, West Tamar, and was buried in Carr Villa cemetery, Launceston.

K R Norman

K R Norman

Kenneth Roy Norman (born 1925) is a leading scholar of Middle Indo-Aryan or Prakrit, particularly of Pali. He saw military service in India and Malaya and studied classics at Cambridge University, and spent most of his career teaching Prakrit at Cambridge University.

He was a visiting professor at SOAS and Berkeley, and President of the Pali Text Society from 1981 to 1994. He is a Fellow of the British Academy. His translations include the Sutta Nipata, Therigatha and Theragatha. Of great specialist interest is his lecture, A Philological Approach to Buddhism, The Bukkyb Dendo Kybkai Lectures 1994, given at SOAS.

John D. Ireland

Steve Hagen

John D. Ireland (1932-1998) was born in North London, England. He became a Buddhist at age eighteen and soon began studying Pali. From the 1960’s onward he was a frequent contributor to the Buddhist Publication Society’s Wheel and Bodhi Leaves series of booklets. But he is perhaps best known for his combined translation, The Udana & the Itivuttaka (Kandy: Buddhist Publication Society, 1997), in reference to which he wrote to a friend shortly before his death: “I feel I could die contented in the knowledge that I have done something to repay the great happiness the Buddha-Dhamma has brought me in this life.”

Steve Hagen

Steve Hagen

steve

Steve Hagen is a Zen priest, a long-time teacher of Buddhism and the author of How the World can be the Way It is. He began studying Buddhism in 1967 and in 1975 became a student of Zen master Dainin Katagiri. Hagen was ordained a Zen priest in 1979 and later studied with a number of other teachers in Asia and Europe. In 1989 he received Dharma Transmission (endorsement to teach) from Katagiri Roshi. Hagen lives in Minneapolis, where he lectures, teaches meditation and leads retreats at the Dharma Field Meditation and Learning Center.